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Drawing (12)

This is a portion of field reports containing choice entries from within our archive.

The reports have been reduced to key ideas which are now contained in Jim's published works (see Store for details).

ATTENTION: There are many pages of blog entries, to go to the next page simply click the small blue letters at the bottom of the page. Enjoy!

They Stared at Goats Because…

Staring at Goats: The Rest of the Story
By: John B. Alexander

There has been substantial derision associated with the book, The Men Who Stare at Goats, and the movie of the same name. However, information has recently come to light that suggests that the basic concept that led to the ignoble title was derived from a painful lesson in the U.S. Army Special Forces history. Specifically, it stems from the capture, and lengthy captivity, of then-Lieutenant James “Nick” Rowe in South Vietnam. For those who may not be familiar with him, Rowe is still considered a hero in Special Forces. Unfortunately, despite his legendary actions as a prisoner of war (POW) in Vietnam, he was assassinated by communist insurgents in Quezon City, in the Philippines on 21 April 1989. Almost presciently, now-Colonel Rowe had reported that he was second or third on the terrorist’s target list.

The basics of his capture and imprisonment are known. On 29 October 1963, LT Rowe, along with Captain Rocky Versace and team medic, Sergeant First Class Dan Pitzer, was taken as a POW near the village of Le Coeur in An Xuyen Province while advising a Civilian Irregular Defense Group (CIDG) unit. The team members were separated and later, in 1965, Rocky Versace was executed by the Viet Cong. He was last heard singing God Bless America at the top of his voice. It was based on reports of his continued resistance, that Versace was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in 2002.

Then, in December 1968, 62 months after falling into the hands of the Viet Cong, Rowe was rescued during an American air cavalry raid in the U-Minh Forest also known as the “forest of darkness.” The years in captivity were extremely harsh for Rowe. He repeatedly attempted to escape and was frequently subjected to torture and physical deprivation. Like Versace, he was also threatened with execution on several occasions. As the VC had grown tired of his continued resistance, Rowe was finally scheduled for execution at the end of December, just a few days after his fortuitous rescue. Even that event proved to be a close call as Rowe was nearly shot by the helicopter crews. Though clad in black pajamas, he was recognized as an American by his beard and scooped up.

Throughout his years in detention Rowe maintained a constant vigil and mental awareness of his surroundings. Though physically weakened, he tried many methods to gain an upper hand. For a long time he convinced the Viet Cong that he was an engineer who happened to be the war zone. Rowe was concealing the fact that he was a Special Forces intelligence officer and had access to information about camps across the Mekong Delta. It was only after some American peace-advocates went to North Vietnam and provided a complete list of names and units that his captors learned his true identity and that they had been fooled. Rowe paid a high price for that revelation, but he had successfully evaded being forced to provide useful information to the enemy. By the time the Viet Cong understood his importance, the information he had was too dated to be actionable.

After his recovery from serious diseases and extensive injuries, Rowe left the Army. Then, in 1981 he was recalled to active duty and went to Ft. Bragg where he became the director the Survival Evasion Resistance and Escape (SERE) course.* The intent of that course was to prepare members of special operations forces, and other personnel conducting high risk missions, to be better prepared for the eventuality of being cut off from friendly forces or worse yet, captured. Obviously, it was Colonel Rowe’s personal experience in captivity that caused the senior leadership of the U.S. Army Special Forces to place him in that position of high responsibility.

Enter the goats. As mentioned, during his captivity Rowe tried a wide variety of techniques to assist in escape. Being the director of SERE, he had considerable latitude in exploration of unique measures that might be helpful for the students. Drawing on his background Rowe was determined to explore all options of techniques that might prove useful. To that end, he directed a senior NCO assigned to the school to track down information about dim mak, a relatively obscure martial arts skill known in English as the death touch. Dim mak defies conventional physiology. It is not a hard blow to a vital organ. Rather, it involves a relatively light strike that is designed to interrupt the flow of chi (or ki in the Japanese tradition) in such a manner that death follows several hours later. According to Chinese medicine philosophy, this life force, or chi, flows along meridians throughout the body and moderates all human functioning. This concept of chi is the basis for the Eastern medical practice of acupuncture, and while easily observable it is not commonly accepted by Western medicine practitioners.

Rowe was painfully aware of the physical degradation that follows captivity. He reasoned that almost all traditional martial arts techniques require too much physical exertion for most prisoners to execute effectively. His interests therefore, were in locating and pursuing techniques that could be employed by POWs while requiring minimum output of physical energy. (Are we still laughing?)

The NCO went to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and worked with members of the combative skills course. There he was told about a civilian instructor by the name of Guy Savelli who professed some of these very advanced skills.

Savelli was contacted, his capabilities verified, and then he was brought to Ft. Bragg where he taught several students. As I told Jon Ronson when the book first came out, “He hit the goat.” At that time I thought it was Savelli who had executed the blow to the goat in question. In fact, it was this same senior NCO who had been trained by Savelli who hit the goat leading directly to its death several hours after that. It was the moderate physical energy expended combined with the delay in time of death that was the sought after outcome. It worked.

As I recorded in my first book, The Warrior’s Edge, I have seen the photos taken of the necropsy that show most remarkable physical damage to the goat. Specifically, there was a path of energy, not unlike what a bullet would produce while transiting a body, which ran across the chest cavity. The difference was that there was no wound of entrance or wound of exit. The NCO has recently confirmed those observations as well. That experiment may be the first tangible, albeit elusive, evidence that dim mak can produce physical results (death). Like this NCO, I trained with Savelli, but for a shorter period of time. That experience left little doubt that Savelli had mastered some very advanced martial arts skills and could teach them to others.

Rowe was not prepared to limit his inquiry to the physical impact of dim mak. Based on his extensive experience with his Viet Cong captors, he believed that they could be mentally influenced. The first objectives were relatively simple. Could a guard be made to look in a certain direction? Could the prisoner cause the guard to walk in a specified direction, or pause for a longer period of time? What were the limits of influence that could be applied by a prisoner?

While the answers to these questions remain obscured, there is some literature, mostly anecdotal, that supports the notion that remote influence is a distinct possibility. During my training in the Washington area, Savelli described to us a technique he called the mind stops. In it, he claimed that he could confront an adversary, and then he would maneuver himself behind that person without them being aware of his movement. This capability is not unique and has been reported by other researchers. One fairly well documented case is that of Wolf Messing, a German Jew who fled to the USSR at the beginning stages of World War II. His unusual mental skills attracted the attention of Stalin who arranged for a series of tests. During one dramatic demonstration he was able to pass by attentive guards and enter Stalin’s well-protected house. When questioned, the guards claimed that they had witnessed Lavrenti Beria, dreaded head of the NKVD, enter the premises, not Messing.

Another, more extreme, form of remote mental influence was reported by KGB defector, Major Nikolai Kokolov. Among other topics Kokolov reported on the extent of psychic research being conducted during the Cold War. In debriefings, he described the Soviet use of mental influencing to actually fracture the spinal columns of test subjects. Current readers may not be aware that lethal experimentation on humans was conducted in several subject areas. By the time he took over leadership of SERE, COL Rowe had access to that intelligence information as well as his personal experience with similar techniques to draw upon.

It is worth noting that beyond the anecdotes, there is scientific research has been conducted in the area of remote influencing. In its most basic form, prayer is a method of invoking remote intervention in one’s life, and there are many studies demonstrating the success of those techniques. Those are beyond the scope of this piece, but worth exploring to interested readers.

In addition to esoteric mental influence techniques, the SERE instructors explored more mundane and pragmatic approaches as well. Of particular interest were martial arts techniques in which the initial movements appeared normal and non-threatening. As an example, simply brushing one’s hair aside in a seemingly harmless manner may allow the prisoner to move their hand within a few inches of a guard’s eyes. Under other conditions, allowing a prisoner’s hand close to vital organs would be perceived as a potential attack, and would likely cause a severe response by the guard.

Camouflaging intent of aggression is not new. In fact, there is an entire martial arts form that was founded on the concept of masquerading offensive movements, thus allowing practice to occur uninhibited. Capoeira is a Brazilian fighting art form that was developed by the African slaves as they prepared for conflict with their owners. The graceful and intricate movements were portrayed as a harmless folk dance. In reality, the moves were designed to enhance the fighting skills of the practitioners. The history dates back at least two centuries, and Capoeira can be observed in many Brazilian cities today.

As renowned commentator Paul Harvey used to proclaim, “And know you know the rest of the story.” Therefore, taken in context, staring at goats, or hitting them, makes more sense than what one might initially believe. Instead of being overly concerned about a foreigner’s attempt at humor via gross distortion of truth, maybe we should embrace this opportunity to explain the perfectly logical origins that form the basis of those experiments. That includes acknowledging visionary contributions of one of our heroes and fallen comrade, Colonel Nick Rowe!

• The site, located at Camp Mackall, NC, is now officially the Colonel James “Nick” Rowe SERE Training Center
• Note: SFC Pitzer was released by the Viet Cong in 1967. This action was in response to American protestor visits. Pitzer was a medic, and the other two POWs released were black soldiers as the VC played the race card.
• Like many SOF personnel, the NCO involved with the SERE training described wishes to remain anonymous. While retired from the U.S. Army, he continues to work in a sensitive position serving the interests of his country.

The U.S. Military and Creativity

The U.S. Military and Creativity
By: John B. Alexander, Ph.D.

FOREWARD

Colonel John Alexander was an original member of the Earth Battalion and served in many interesting paranormal
scouting efforts. Eventually he headed up the non-lethal weapons world for the Army. He continues to be a trusted thinker and solid communicator to the Defense world about many of the gifts created by the members of this circle of pioneers. Thanks for this outstanding coverage of much of the Battalions near legendary works
John. Jim Channon

=====================================================================

The U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) lists four core values: Integrity, Courage, Competency, and Creativity. In 2006, as a senior fellow at the Joint Special Operations University (JSOU), I drafted a monograph addressing creativity as it applied to Special Operations Forces (SOF).* Indeed, SOF elements pride themselves their ability to quickly adapt to rapidly changing, and often extremely dangerous situations, and rightfully so. Of concern to me was not the myriad of operations successfully conducted by small units. Rather, it was that problems emerge when large organizations, such as USSOCOM, attempt to institutionalize creativity. To quote on young U.S. Army Special Forces officer I encountered in Timbuktu, “Creativity is directly proportional to the distance from the flag pole.”

Having been involved in many creative projects during my 32 years in the United States military, and observing the Army’s responses to them, my objective was to point out that creativity is much easier to say, than it is to execute in large organizations. Almost invariably, as creative projects gain increased visibility, the more traditional values of the large system come in conflict. When that happens, steps are taken to eliminate the creative project.

In the monograph I addressed seven such innovative Army projects as well as several from the other services. (No service, organization, or individual has a corner on creativity.) The Army projects addressed were all successful, yet all were terminated as opposition from conventional sources rose. One of those projects, the Army’s Organizational Effectiveness program, was probably the largest institutional transformation project ever undertaken by any organization.

The monograph covered several projects, including remote viewing, that run counter to conventional scientific wisdom. Despite theoretical arguments about the fundamental causation, an operational capability was developed. However, because of the perceived controversial nature of some of the material, including remote viewing, an executive decision was made that the monograph would not be published by a U.S. Government organization. Based on my agreement with JSOU, I am free to publish that material in other sources. The monograph will be done in its entirety in book form at a later date.

Given the recent development of the inept and highly fictionalized book, Men Who Stare at Goats, as a movie, it was determined it would be useful to present a more accurate picture of the history surrounding some of those projects. While the book tends to present the material in a ridiculing and somewhat humorous manner, these projects were both successful and developed with a lot of serious thought behind them. Both Jim Channon and I are covered extensively in the book, for which even the title is misleading. (While there was a goat involved, it was physically hit by a martial arts instructor.) This article will present material that provides background on two of the seven projects. One lesser-known project, called Task Force Delta, was closely related to Jim Channon’s legendary and boundary-breaking work on The First Earth Battalion.** In a large part, it was we, the members of Task Force Delta, who initially helped spread the about Jim Channon’s creative endeavor.

Appendix B

Task Force Delta
Creativity is the power to connect the seemingly unconnected.
— William Plomer
The early 1980s military think tank called Task Force Delta was an extremely creative organization dedicated to exploring concepts of high performance. It is unlikely that any military unit has ever been as cost-effective. General Don Starry actuated the concept when he was the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) commander (1977-1981). He was familiar with James Grier Miller’s Living Systems theory, which was just emerging at that time. This theory posited that all living systems, no matter what size or complexity, had three main functions. Those were input, throughput, and output and they applied from unicellular life, such as ameba, through large social organizations including the U.S. Army.

General Starry believed that systems theory offered lessons that would be beneficial to the Army’s development and the future challenges that it would face. Initially Colonel Mike Malone, a respected leadership and systems theory expert, directed the evolution of the organization. With Malone’s retirement, the Task Force Delta think tank soon moved to the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. Then Lieutenant Colonel Bill Witt provided leadership while waiting for the permanent director to be transferred from the Army Chief of Staff office. Lieutenant Colonel Frank Burns, an OE officer for General Meyer, became the director and remained there until the unit was abolished. All of those directors possessed inquisitive minds and a healthy understanding of emerging systems theory.

The basis of the Task Force Delta think tank was an extremely small core group, supported by interested people, all of whom worked in other organizations. The entire staff consisted of one lieutenant colonel, one civilian equivalent, and three administrative personnel. Participation by other people was on a totally voluntary basis. Frank Burns cast a wide net both inside the Army and in the civilian sector looking for people with innovative ideas and concepts they could contribute. Meetings were held quarterly, and most participants had to secure their own funding. Even many civilians with no other affiliation with the Army attended at their own expense. The meetings were so mentally stimulating that members rarely missed a session.

Some sessions could best be described as data gathering and mental cross-pollination. Presentations on a wide range of topics would be arranged. For many of the civilians it was a unique opportunity to provide ideas directly to an Army audience that was open to new ideas. Some noted their frustration at previous attempts to beat on the Army’s front door only to find that most offices were just too busy to listen. In those times, fighting fires was the theme of the day.

More important than the formal sessions was the ability to network with bright, innovative people. It was not uncommon for informal gatherings to go on late into the night, sometimes at the expense of nodding off the next day. That really did not matter. Also significant were the interpersonal contacts that routinely assisted participants in their regular assignments back at home station. Many deep bonds were formed. In fact, a substantial number of these relationships continue today, nearly 25 years later and long after the official demise of the Task Force Delta think tank.

On occasion, tasks would be assigned to the members attending the Task Force Delta think tank meetings. An example is when Lieutenant General Max Thurman, then Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, asked the group to explore all aspects of future Army personnel issues. The topics ranged from recruiting and retention to professional education, health and welfare, leadership principles, organizational structures and assignments, and emerging human capabilities. In response, meetings were conducted from Monday through Thursday noon. Initially plenary sessions occurred and later small, self-defined groups that discussed specific aspects of the personnel system. As with other meetings, these sessions tended to run through meals and late into the evening.

At noon on Thursday the discussions stopped, and the real work began. Each person decided what topic area they wanted to contribute to. A chapter outline was provided, and the teams went to work. Being very self-motivated, most people worked continuously throughout the night. When General Thurman arrived at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, he received a bound book containing the deliberations on all aspects of the personnel system and many suggestions about how to deal with future complex issues.

Two items are important to remember for this 1982 time: a) word processing, as it is commonly known today, did not exist and b) the think tank conference attendees were all volunteers. Nobody had a laptop computer, shared networks, or memory sticks. The physical requirements of producing a written document of that magnitude took tremendous effort. Nobody was graded on their input, nor would their efforts ever be reflected in personal efficiency reports. Some of the participants were civilians, whose only motivation was the excitement of being able to collaborate in a truly high performing organization and the possibility that somebody might read their concepts and recognize that it could be applied in the Army.

Obviously the book had not been edited, and chapter formats did not all match; that would come later. The success was definitively demonstrating the primary effort necessary to create such a complex document in a short period of time. The Task Force Delta think tank proved what systems theorists predicted about the possibilities that emerge when high performing organizations are tasked and then given permission to respond as they deem necessary.

The networking efforts went far beyond periodic meetings. The Task Force Delta think tank led the way in obtaining and initiating computer networks that were populated by regular people, not just techno-wizards. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, only a few researchers and innovative managers understood the potential power of computer networks. Malone envisioned a small organization that could be used to research the possibilities that emerging technology and networking provided by the think tank. At this time, personal computers were scarcely known. Yet many of the think tank members were given one to take home and use. Most of the communication was done during off-duty hours and transmitted at the rate of 600 baud, thus simple messages could take several minutes to download. In an age where 24 mega bits per second (Mbps) is attainable, communicating at such slow speeds is almost inconceivable.

While the Internet concept in 1980 was embryonic, the ability to network was considered extremely innovative. For the first time, the Task Force Delta think tank members demonstrated how to staff papers around the world in less than 24 hours. This ability was a dramatic improvement over the telecommunications of the day, or sending printouts via mail and taking weeks for coordination.

Following Malone’s initial guidance, the composition of the Task Force Delta think tank remained closely balanced. He insisted that organizational composition include what he termed both “bumblebees and butterflies.” In other words, as a counterweight to some pretty far out ideas, he wanted people with their feet planted firmly on the ground and an excellent sense for the realistic needs of the Army. As we were just coming out of the Vietnam War, virtually all of the Army officers involved had combat experience, which served well as a sobering reminder of the real world.

What the Task Force Delta think tank demonstrated was that high performing networks could provide significant advantages over traditional organizational communications. The financial costs were very small compared to the return of efforts provided from the vast volunteer network that addressed a myriad of tasks because they found it interesting. People worked extensively, not because they had to, but because they wanted to. Guidance was minimal and generally not necessary. Participants with difficult problems could have near instant access to a wide range of technical experts. As each scouted the burgeoning intellectual terrain, they reported back, often self-initiating new areas of inquiry. However, some traditional leaders viewed such intellectual freedom as a threat. Shortly thereafter, the Task Force Delta think tank was closed.

Appendix C
Origins of the First Earth Battalion
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
— William Shakespeare, Hamlet
During the late 1970s and early 1980s one of the Army’s brightest and most futuristic thinkers was Lieutenant Colonel Jim Channon. A military intelligence officer by training, Channon served 10 years in the Infantry, including an assignment as a platoon leader in Vietnam. He also had spent some time in Public Affairs. As such, he was even assigned the Army interface with Hollywood. During this period Channon initiated a scouting mission to explore the various emerging human potential movements that were burgeoning in California at the time. This effort was purely volitional and conducted mostly on his free time. In no way could his activities be construed as part of the domestic surveillance activities that later led to extreme difficulties for the military.6

Among his personal skills Channon was (and still is) a phenomenally gifted artist. He had an extraordinary ability to listen to people describe abstract concepts, then quickly transform those ideas into easily understandable graphics. In fact, some of the basic symbols and graphic designs used in the Army today originated with Channon over 25 years ago. His artistic ability and mental acuity were widely known by senior officers who often coveted his capabilities. Before Thurman briefed the U.S. Army senior leadership, he would always ask, “Where’s Jimmy?” Although assigned outside of the Pentagon, even on the West Coast, Channon would be summoned to quickly create the visual briefing materials. His renderings included a vast number of the normal overhead transparencies as well as his large-scale summaries called “monster-grams,” continuous charts that would cover many feet and could be taped to the walls of the briefing room. The state of the art in projection technology had not advanced to a degree anywhere close to what is available today.

Channon was also a key member of the Task Force Delta think tank and worked closely with Frank Burns and others in that circle. Therefore, he was one of the group who were seriously engaged in studying cultural transformation in the post-Vietnam era. As repeated attempts to convey transitional concepts in traditional briefing format failed, Channon realized that an innovative framework was required to help people fully understand the significance of these events. As with all organizations, especially old institutions, change is mightily resisted. The concept, he believed, had to be one that fostered free thinking, or what later became known as “out of the box” thinking.

The name First Earth Battalion literally appeared in his head during one of his many transcontinental flights. He terms this innovation as a “mystical hit.” The concept was to create a large catalogue of possibilities and display them graphically. At that time a book titled The Whole Earth Catalogue was selling widely in New Age circles. It contained pages and pages of new technologies, techniques, and materials from which the reader could choose. Similarly, Channon created the First Earth Battalion catalogue as a field manual, which was designed to provide readers a permissive-thinking platform. Channon now describes the Earth Battalion as protomythological—looking at the future while rooted in a historic framework (the battalion). The motto of the First Earth Battalion was dare to think the unthinkable. These words were taken in a positive sense, not the foreboding notion that meant massive death.

Channon’s drawings were done in black and white. Often they were sketchy and suggestive with limited text, and the concepts intentionally never were written out in detail. He wanted people to fill in the missing material for themselves. The concept was to get people to think, not to view the catalogue as a finished document, or worse, a total blueprint for an actual Army organization.

Many of the concepts were way beyond the understanding of traditional Army officers. For instance, exchanging soldiers and their families to populate critical targets in opposing countries was never seriously considered as a viable operational concept. Rather, by describing a conscience corps, Channon was focusing on the consequences in human terms should a nuclear exchange occur. In truth, many in the military had become rather cavalier when discussing nuclear strike capabilities. However impractical in reality the notion was, it did cause readers to think about the implications of nuclear strikes in a new and more personal light. He eventually bundled these ideas under what he called “combat for collective conscience.” As he predicted, global opinion today is shaped by the ethical judgments of the world that watches combat unfold.

Well before the current outpouring of concerns about global warming, Channon’s work had strong ecological preservation components. He envisioned energy conservation, recycling technologies, and reforestation as voluntary integrants of the military, not issues to be forced on posts through draconian legislation. In many areas Channon’s concepts were way ahead of their times; and he readily acknowledges the need for an incubation period, often years and maybe decades, before new ideas can be brought to fruition. As a further example, in a 1979 version of the First Earth Battalion, he already envisioned strategic micro forces—smaller units that could act decisively without requiring the massing of larger forces. In a way, he was describing what SOF has become but at a time when these elements were not as highly regarded as they are today.

Balance was an essential element in much of Channon’s work. In some areas the Army could easily accept his ideas. Physical fitness, albeit with lower impact on joints, was reasonable. He was a strong advocate of establishing and maintaining a healthy diet. New theories were emerging about how the brain functions and exercises to enhance cognitive capabilities. The use of previsualization before engaging in complex tasks was encouraged. Also advocated were ancient, and proven effective, meditation techniques.

Establishing a balance between mind and body seemed to resonate well in the Army. However, Channon’s notions of integrating spiritual concepts, especially ones that transcended national boundaries, were of more concern to some casual observers. In fact, the First Earth Battalion did suggest that individuals would operate in a global, not national, context and focused on planetary peace making. The acknowledgement of a tripartite balance of body, mind, and spirit is less well accepted within military circles. The concept of the warrior-monk has survived for millennia. However, in the U.S. Army, spiritual matters were generally left to the chaplains and seen as matters of personal choice. Channon, however, invoked the need for balance in all three domains, and did so unapologetically.

At the time Channon wrote the First Earth Battalion, General “Shy” Meyer was the U.S. Army Chief of Staff. As the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, he had inherited an Army that was in need of repair. Meyer’s efforts to rebuild the Army continued as he was selected over many more senior generals as one of the youngest Army Chiefs of Staff. Throughout his tenure Meyer strived to create an environment that permitted exploration. Channon viewed the publication of the First Earth Battalion, and its acceptance by many senior officers, as a mechanism for more junior officers to see that they had permission to think more freely.7

A limited number of original copies were made of the First Earth Battalion. Initially these 300 copies were circulated to selected members of Task Force Delta think tank. The draft annotation on the title page expressed the notion that this document was a living instrument. Demand for copies quickly grew as information about the script spread via word of mouth. Those officers holding originals began photocopying additional copies and handing them to friends. Channon notes that this was an intentional means of distribution as it created a mystique about the nature of the manuscript and gave it enhanced value. Many people who had only a vague notion of the Task Force Delta think tank wanted copies of the coveted First Earth Battalion. People who never would have normally read the paper did so because of the preternatural aura associated with owning a copy. The underground distribution technique probably ensured wider readership than it would have obtained had it been formally printed and officially sent out. The effectiveness of this scheme has been noted. Over the decades, photocopied versions of the original manuscript could be found with officers who were interested in future concepts. With the military today, a sub rosa element that circulates this document still exists.

Soon this somewhat mysterious concept was to escape beyond the bonds of the Army. Within a short time civilian media were asking Channon for information about the First Earth Battalion. In February 1982, a popular publication of the day, Omni Magazine, carried an article by that title. That was quickly followed by a Dateline segment on NBC that featured Lieutenant Colonel Channon discussing the inner workings of the notional organization. Despite prior approval of the Public Affairs Office at Fort Lewis, Washington, many senior officers in the “Big Army” were not happy seeing a lieutenant colonel pushing the conceptual envelope on national television.

Under-appreciated by a number of traditional-minded generals, Channon retired from the Army in September 1982. He retained the copyright for First Earth Battalion, and in recent years he has slightly updated the original publication by adding a colored cover. It is currently available on the Internet. In 2005 more than 10,000 copies were downloaded for free; printed copies are sold to those interested in that format. As testament to the efficacy of the notional concepts Channon brought to the Army, he successfully transitioned those same skills to the civilian sector. There, he has assisted a dozen of the world’s largest 100 companies (and many others) to envision their futures. He provides multidimensional graphics and storytelling magic that allow their employees to more fully comprehend, and be charged, by the company’s objectives.

In a recent interview, Channon noted many of the key aspects that led to the development of First Earth Battalion. At that time the Army depended heavily on formal written documents to convey structural information. Various field manuals and other official publications provided rather sterile, highly organized transfer mechanisms for technical information. Eschewed by the military, Channon opined, was transmission of the cultural information that engendered the soul of the organization. Like today, the late 1970s was a period of cultural transformation as the Army struggled to recover from the distasteful experience of Vietnam. To be successful, the change must be deeper than doctrine documents. Channon’s objective was to revitalize the Army he loved at a most visceral level.

Channon studied various religious rites of passage. Throughout history these rituals have evoked primal emotions, a very scary notion, even counterintuitive, for many staid military officers. He noted also the importance of symbology and ceremonies. True loyalty was not something obtained by a written or sworn oath. Rather deep and abiding loyalty comes from shared common experience, especially when endured in hardship. To communicate culture means establishing programs that produced many such shared experiences and often incorporated historical events of great importance to the organization. He noted that cultural transference through ceremonies has tended to be squeezed out by the exigencies of day-to-day business. The importance of this medium is still not fully understood.

Beyond the printed document, Channon embodied the essence of cultural transformation. He advocated and demonstrated the ability to simultaneously communicate complex, value-laden information on multiple channels simultaneously. Employing visual and auditory effects as well as orchestrated emotional stimuli, Channon’s techniques had the ability to initiate concordance in multisensory modes so that soldiers would integrate the Army’s values at a deep-seated, core level.

Psychic Soldiers Can Save Lives

THE I N T E R D I M E N S I O N A L WORLD

Learning to sensitize the combatants awareness to reduce the carnage of kinetc war in counter-insurgency ops.

I lost a soldier my first day of combat in Vietnam. It was on what they called a search and destroy operation. My Platoon would move into deeply forested areas to root out fortified enemy positions after making the noisiest possible entrance using helicopters and artillery preparations. The enemy with fortified positions around their villages could then decide whether to ambush us as we tromped noisily into their fields of fire or simply evacuate before we arrived. This was as ignorant a tactical approach as the British redcoats marching at us in lines with white cross hairs on their chests. The enemy in this case the American minutemen were hiding behind trees and sniping away at will. But all new wars begin with the tactics of the war that preceded.

My airborne infantry rifle platoon was clearly going to be subject to more of this bull headed thinking in the coming year so we developed a way to move with the maximum stealth. In that mode we began to develop a radar like sensitivity that could only be called telepathic and I learned to detect enemy soldiers 200 meters away in thick underbrush. I never lost another man in 319 days of combat. This was my first experience of remote viewing. But it didn’t have a name then so no one spoke about it. Needless to say I was sure there was another potent dimension “inside” the physical world I had been taught to live in. I was somehow sure I would make that world possible for the soldiers who would follow me.

Everyone pretty much knows about telepathy. Some know about clairvoyance. Others have heard of possession by another being. The interesting thing to me is that these are all part of an interdimensional reality that is simply not recognized for the scale of its actual presence on this earth. Each of the concepts above are considered abnormal events that occur at the edge of normal life but, certainly don’t point to the fact that there is an actual “other kind “ of normal life that occurs in a wide band of signals and energy that interpenetrate the invisible realms all around our “normal” world all the time and are becoming more and more accesible all the time. We live in the physical world and simultaneously we live in a non-physical world that is pushing its way very convincingly into the consciousness of all those who accept its presence and have a sensitive enough antenna to sense it.

I recently had an experience with a person called a clear channel who was verbally relating a conversation between myself and two other beings from two different star systems. Then the channeling person jerks about and one of the star beings emerges in her body and begins speaking. I am distinctly qualified to notice the complete shift in her every mannerism, tone of voice, and content orientation since I mimic voices and other characters I have created and I know her own habituated patterns in detail. They were not the same. She was someone else during those moments.

This means that time /distance works in the physical dimension in one way and in the inter-dimensional world in many other ways. It also means that we are simultaneously conducting our own human affairs based on physical principles but a growing number of people are also having their affairs assisted by beings from beyond and without any appreciable loss in time/space as we know it.

To me there are some fascinating possibilities here. One, space ships may have been invented by humans trying to make sense of this other world but certainly are not necessary for most inter-galactic connections. To occur. Two, we may all have or have had some inter-dimensional other world lives. Actually it could be that there are no earth people on this planet that have not already been extra-terrestrial before. Three, we could be an experiment conducted by a host of other galactic entities who occasionally nudge the progress of earth but are mainly trying to see if their new DNA experiments with us in their Petri dish called planet earth are producing any new social inventions they could benefit from. This is why they are not interfering with the experiment.

Arcturus as a research group I lead looks at ways to ease and end conflict on this planet and since there are any number of inter-dimensional tools that could reduce the carnage of kinetic warfare we find the subtle worlds very potent. Entering villages to root out terrorists is a low percentage win for armed soldiers. Entering in non-lethal way … disarming booby traps psycho kinetically… having psychic warriors who can see through walls and assess the internal motivations of villagers to determine their potential danger as assassins or bombers … temporarily incapacitating suspicious villagers so they won’t over-react during search operations … these are all potentially powerful tools to civilize police work and reduce the collateral damage caused by the erratic conflict of urban style guerrilla warfare.

We shall include the telepathic/telempathic skills in our taxonomy of our psionics research. Communications methodologies like neuro linguistic programming that examine covert influence technologies and many similar reframing approaches to the truth are also key toolsets we use to understand inside controls and manipulation by organizations bent on terrorism. The “Big Lie” has worked for years by dictatorships to reinforce half truths by the simple repetition of the same lie. To create a peaceful world the armed forces must be keenly aware of how a population is propagandized. Similarly, the obverse is true, they must know how to present environmental safety information with the clearest toolset which for example might be visual language like that found on an airline safety instructions card. There is little room for deceit in such a language form. Psionics will cover all these bases.

There are daily stories of people who have serious conversations with their pets and others with plants. These dimensions are getting more attention as time goes by. I have seen a woman communicate with a cat who was lost simply by knowing the cats name and then telepathically asking the cat to describe its location. Then upon investigation the cat was discovered within minutes even though over a mile away and up on a roof. Police now use psychics to find missing persons. It could be this would be another way to approach a contested area in combat. At the moment there is a real effort to give soldiers robotic radio controlled vehicles to enter such danger zones. Without being shot in order to discover the target was not friendly.

The point is simply to add some sanity to what are always dangerous situations that get out of hand and before the first inappropriate over reaction kills dozens of innocent bystanders. The lifelong trauma inflicted upon the hapless soldiers is itself unnecessary and avoidable. A quick psychic shiatsu shakedown works wonders to disable the trauma before it is buried beneath deep guilt.

There are also thousands of stories of sensitive people who must deal with discarnate souls (ghosts) who for some reason are trapped in the earth dimension and plea to be released. Dreams are rampant with messages from others who are in trouble. Healers talk on the phone with patients and can diagnose their illnesses at great distances with the clarity of a an exam that comes normally in a direct physical hands on connection. But we now know an invisible bundle of data somehow exists and is available inter-dimensionally to people who are tuned in.

I have heard a man tell others of my unique skillset simply because we were on the same conference call on the phone and he could access my inner world at will. There are many many stories of people having regular telepathic connections. I say it is time to wrap this all up into a generalized understanding that wideband inter-dimensional communications is a reality.
It is not witchcraft.

There is now clear evidence to support the idea that numbers of trained meditators can collectively entrain a specific place with a coherent (clear and integrated ) energy field and reduce the crime and violent indicators in that area. We might think of that as a “prep” which is what happens when an artillery or air unit saturates an area in advance with munitions in order to suppress any likely response. In this case it is a barrage of calm. That would be my preference as a platoon leader.

I offer that collectively the many types of inter-dimensional communications we experience could simply be understood as another now common yet invisible dimension that exists as a whole reality and not be seen as separate anomalies. Then we could all begin to use and understand the capacity of such a knowing. Then we could bring it to bear to influence peaceful operations in a dirty war situation like the confusing urban conflicts in the Middle East and Africa where innocent people are simply in the way of the fray.

We can improve the lot of the soldier so they are not mindlessly introduced to unpredictable situation, This has been central to the work of the earth battalion for thirty years. To improve the live giving abilities of the frontline soldier. At the same time not irrationally provoke the response of suspicious elements on the battlefield and if possible sooth them at a distance before the engagement. To this end we offer the field of psionics. Here we bundle as many of the dimensions of indirect contact as we can in order to make contested areas and peoples as non-lethal as we can.

Remember, it is as damaging to a soul to have to shoot someone as to be shot. Our work to immediately reduce resistance and battlefield trauma as an adjunct to the reducing the conflict before it begins. Not everybody is equipped in all of these new dimensions just as not everybody cannot observe and listen well enough to be a great scout. But the investment in knowing these psychic tools can be used thoughtfully is beynd important for the front line combatants.

Military Bases Transforming to Eco Parks

By DR. KEVIN DONAHER

We could help unify the peace movement and the green economy movement by working together on a visionary campaign that would transform U.S. military bases into Eco-Universities/Eco-Industrial Parks. The 865 U.S. military bases around the world represent institutional inertia rather than any real national security interest of the American people. Quite the contrary: by inserting thousands of young, poorly educated yet well-armed American males into foreign cultures they know little about, we are generating resentment that fuels the passions of those who would do us harm.

The force structure and strategic doctrine of the U.S. military was forged over 60 years of preparing for a land war with Soviet tank armies on the steppes of Eastern Europe. Now the threat is a suicidal individual with a suitcase bomb containing radioactive material. The struggle against this type of zealotry cannot be won with tanks and bombs, it is a war for hearts and minds, and that war can be won with green job creation on a grand scale.

This campaign would call for handing U.S. bases back to their respective national governments, with the U.S. government and civil society institutions undertaking a clean-up campaign during the transition in ownership. Through grassroots networks and donations from local citizens, the local governments would be encouraged to transform these bases into educational and experimental clean-tech centers promoting green practices that will help us address the environmental crisis while generating good green jobs and eco-entrepreneurship.

The conversion of these bases into models of eco-development would be beneficial to the United States in many ways:

it would help transform the U.S. from a dominating empire into a global partner, thereby making us more appreciated and less of a target for terrorist attacks;
it would save U.S. taxpayers billions of dollars now being wasted on maintaining this global network of bases;
it will have a positive impact on the planet we all share by helping countries develop more sustainable practices and cutting-edge green technology.
Military bases are large enough space for permaculture “Eco-Universities” to train the trainers who will then go out and instruct communities on green economy issues such as green building, energy conservation, renewable energy technology, urban agriculture, water conservation, natural purification of grey water and black water, clean-tech incubation, alternative transportation, neighborhood empowerment policies, and much more.

The Green Festivals can bring together the relevant experts and host sessions focused on how to transform U.S. military bases into Eco-Universities/Eco-Industrial Parks.

Dr. Kevin Danaher is a co-founder of Global Exchange (1988), co-founder of TransFairUSA (1997), founder and Executive Co-Producer of the Green Festivals (2001) and Executive Director of the Global Citizen Center (2004). He was also the co-founder and designer of ESLI, the Environmental Service Learning Initiative, and he created GreenGuardians.ning.com featuring 200 green career training videos and other green job resources.

Dr. Danaher has spoken at universities and at community organizations throughout the U.S. He conducts workshops on issues ranging from the dynamics of the global economy to how we can accelerate the transition to the green economy. His presentation, “Getting Your Green Career Together” is Saturday Oct. 24th on the Center Stage at Green Festival Washington D.C. He is also presenting “Accelerating the Transition into a Unified Green Economy” Saturday November 6th on the Green Lifestyle Stage at Green Festival San Francisco.

ATTN Jedi Warrior Monks: Your Membership is Self-Organizing

THE LIFE
OF A NEW EARTH ARMY
JEDI WARRIOR MONK

The life of a jedi warrior monk is a pilgrimage. The journey is to claim your soul and bring alive the biosphere around you where ever you are. For in our soul is the perfection of the human being that is far more evolved than today’s culture would lead you to Believe. Your planet wants a single vibrant and evolved civilization of human beings who find that love reigns supreme. Your planet is capable of producing paradise before your eyes. Just nurture her and surround yourself with her presence and that paradise will appear!
Heaven is a state of mind. To find heaven one must merely accept the total magic of the life that exists in us and around us. The Universe we experience is, as she exists, a miracle beyond the imagination of anyone alive today. Marry this reality with your heart and inspect the truth of it in even the smallest of creatures.
Extend all your senses out into the biosphere and learn to expect that she will speak to you in so many ways. Master the idea that you will live on many dimensions and then actually do that in present time. Soon Universe will introduce you to your other selves from the many other dimensions where you reside also.
Paradise is the craft of your life. Bring out the paradise in all that is around you. Find that piece of countryside that you can steward into layers of beauty, and sound, and aroma’s beyond your present imagination. Find an earth family of people and animals that will join in on this quest. Eventually become self-sufficient on your personally developed eco-homestead.
Nourish the small town near you. it can all have the full set of pleasures available in the full spectrum global village. No need to fly off somewhere and look out the window of a bus. Bring life home. Everyone should have a place to dance and sing and fully engage in the spirit of living that represents the many cultures of earth.
In the end you will only have one person to answer to for the quality of your time here on earth … and that someone is you! Take charge of your life and make the journey as rich as possible. If there is not enough room for love in the pattern you experience… change the pattern. There will be other chances at life. No one dies. All ascend continuously. But the quality of all you do rests in your capacity to arrange an interesting life and being able to live it as fully as you can.
Love wins and GOPLanet!